LATIN AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURES JOURNAL. Pennsylvania State University, Pittsburgh. vols. 1 to 2

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Vol. 1 (1985)

pp. 1-12 Anatilde Idoyaga Molina : "The Myth of NesoGe". [Pilaga`]

bird-nester myth

p.

myth

2

"when that women who is called Neso`Ge was menstruating, she went with her husband to look for the chicks of a parrot. The husband climbed a tree and began to grab the chicks and throw them down to his wife ... . He came down out of the tree ... . ... She killed her husband and instantly began to eat him. ... She had her husbandís head, and ... her yika ("bag"), she put the head inside of it. ...

3

Then ... all of the people got inside the tree. ... Neso`Ge put her fingernail inside [the tree], she died because Kakadela`chi>i cut off her [finger]nail. ... After she was dead, ... tobacco and squash came out of ... Her body".

{"coming to the aid of the bird-nester, Jaguar demands that he throw down the fledglings so he could eat them." (SL, p. 196, fn. *, citing The Raw and the Cooked, pp. 68-77)

SL = Claude Levi-Strauss (transl. by Catherine Tihanyi) : The Story of Lynx. U of Chicago Pr, 1995.}

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pp. 13-27 Edmundo Magan~a : "Carib Myths about the Origin of Some Animal Species". [Maroni river basin in Surinam]

[Maroni district] origin of peccaries

p.

myth

16

"In~aguare` ... arrived at a large pool of water next to which was a big kuma:ka tree. From one of the cottonwood treeís branches, a multicolored ara:mari serpent was hanging. The stranger ... cut the serpent ..., and when the segments fell into the water, they turned into aima:ris [huge fishes]."

17

When the human eaters of these aima:ri-s had fallen asleep, from their hammock those eaters "fell and were transformed into ... (Dycotiles labiatus) ... the peccaries without a collar ... called pa:sal because of their white beards."

[Wayambo district] origin of dolphin & peccary

p.

myth

20

"two sisters were in love with a tapir. ... [One brother observed this,]

21

the brothers caught him and cut him into pieces and left the body in the same place." One sister became a manatee (yara:wa) in the river; the other sister became a dolphin (iririkula) in the sea.

[Maroni district] the female parrot & the bitch that became women

p.

myth

24

"This happened before the big flood." While huntsman was for 7 days absent in the forest, his 2 female pets, a parrot and a bitch, removed their skins, became women, feeling "cold", "went out for wood and started a fire." The man discovered them.

25

"This happened when the trees talked."

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pp. 75-78 Richard Luxton : "The Mayan Alphabet of Fray Diego de Landa".

pp. 76-78 alphabet as syllabary

p.

lett.

syll.

meaning

76

A

a>h

name of a fish species

 

A

ha

water

 

A

ak

tongue

 

B

be

path

 

B

be

animal pad print

 

C,

zec

a month-name

 

T

t>k

wasp

 

E

he

egg

 

H

he>eb

tied bunch

 

I

i

larvae in maize

76-7

C

ca

comb; grinder

77

K

 

grindstone

 

L & M

 

?

 

N

ne

tail

 

O

oc

collection; entry

 

O

 

?

 

P

pek

hound

 

P>

p>uuc

personís chest

 

Cu

ku

god

 

Ku

ku

nest

 

X

xay

handful

 

X

xe

vomit

77-8

U

uo

moon (tongue)

 

U

 

lock of hair

 

Z

 

painted vase

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pp. 97-121 Neville Stiles : "The Creation of Coxtecame, the Discovery of Corn, the Rabbit in the Moon and Other Nahuatl Narratives". [state of Hidalgo, Mexico]

p. 102 [Huejutla] creation of the coxtecame

"a god ... had his home in a red disk ... in a paradise. They possessed a corn cob in each of their chins ... and they reproduced themselves by mixing their breath. {in Chinese, "union of breaths" is a metaphor for sexual intercourse} Then one day a man, a dark-skinned man, broke off the corn cob which was in his chin and throwing it far away made fun of it. ... So then the god, Nanahuatzin, became very angry ... . ...

The Huasteca Indians passed through Pa`nuco. Then Nan[a]huatzin plucked out his eyes {cf. "if thine eye offend thee, pluck it out"} in sorrow and flung them far away. One of them fell in these parts and the other disappeared somewhere ... . The eye which fell here is now borne by the ceremonial dancers who wear it on their head-dress. It is represented by a mirror. ["ceremonial dancers among the Huasteca ... wear the small round mirrors over their foreheadsí (p. 119, n. 5)] The other eye fell ... into a river at the confluence of the Papaloapan and Coatzacoalcos Rivers ..., and when this world comes to an end, the dancers will have reached the other eye of our god."

"Now there was also a rabbit that lived in the Moon and he came down to Earth ... to warn us about how there would be a huge flood. [Huasteca of San Luis Potosi` : "a farmer ... succeeded in catching a cuatoche or rabbit which raised up at dawn trees which the farmer had felled the day before ... . In exchange for his freedom, the rabbit predicted an impending flood ... so high it almost touched the Moon. The rabbit ... jumped on to the Moon and remained there." (p. 119, n. 8)] ...

a young girl ... was made pregnant by the (scent of the) cedar wood tree. ...

Now the Huasteca Indians will not rest until they find the other eye of our god ... . But when we succeed in finding the other, then it will be the end of the world and we shall be living in the south of Mexico where the large stone heads are."

[Panacaxtlan] women & the moon

p.

myth

109

"the Moon comes down and makes love and has [sexual] intercourse in order to produce her first menstruation." [Huasteca of Hidalgo : "It is necessary for the moon to come down to earth in the form of a rabbit to produce a virginís first menstruation." (p. 120, n. 17)]

110

"If the Moon was extinguished, ... only the women would exist."

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pp. 137-147 Frank Loveland : "Of Mauli, Macaws and Other Things". [Rama of eastern Nicaragua]

p. 137 /mauli/ "fireflies"; "basket which could be filled with large tropical fireflies and thus utilized as a lantern"

{cf. [Hawai>ian] /mauli/ "heart"; /mauli>awa/ "hiccough" (heartbeat and hiccough are each pulsating, much like flirefliesí luminosity)}

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Vol. 2 (1986)

pp. 92-109 Juan Adolfo Va`zquez : "The Reconstruction of the Myth of Inkarri". [Peru`]

Inkarri`

p.

location of informants

myth

94

Chancaray in Ayacucho

"Inkarri` is the son of the Mother Moon and Father Sun. Inkarri` tied up Father Sun so that time might last."

95

Huamanga in Ayacucho

"The father of Inkarri` was the Sun, who begot him from an ignorant mother, who was abandoned and starving. ...

The Inkaís woman was Colla, so they called her Collari`."

 

Puquio in Ayacucho

"the father of Inkarri` was the Sun."

96

Pulcan in Ancash

"Inkarri` as a precocious child who "began to walk when he was five days old" and who, "after eight days began to speak." He had women with whom he travelled in the country dancing to the sound of harp and violin. {these terms for stringed instruments are actually applied to types of drums Ė "The wooden drum that they use ... is called the Violin ..., and the other, larger drum is called the Guitar." (ShT, p. 74)} "When the King wanted to build a house, he gave orders to the stones, which by themselves formed into houses"".

97

Isua

"on the Aqnu mountain where Inkarri` tied up the Sun, there is an abundance of ... llamans, alpacas ..., and ... chicha ... drinks boil over there."

 

Huamanga

"to construct a bridge to Cuzco. Ri Inka "brought together all the stones," which by themselves arranged into a bridge during a single night."

 

Andamarca

"Inkarri` displays powers ..., enclosing the wind in a cave, as well as ice and hail. He also invented, in Qelqata, chicha ... and fire-water, which is still boiling there like clear water. ... the

98

 

staff was thrown ... . As the staff fell, it divided Inkpallata mountain ... . Inkarri[`] also made the waterfall at Inkapacha, and with a whip gathered stones to build buildings and some tables in Osqonta."

 

Chancaray in Ayacucho

"Inkarri` ... made stones walk, and began building a bridge".

 

Huamanga

"it was Inkarri` who repaired his wasted sandals in Wataqa".

 

Puquio

"Inkarri` imprisons the wind in the great Osqonta mountain, and, with ... hoops, the sun in Osqonta, the lesser mountain, in order that the day might last ... . He drove stones to the mountain tops, ordering them by whiplash. ... "On the pampa of Qellcata ... is boiling, chicha, and firewater".

99

Collaguas in Arequipa

"Inkarri` ... is the cause of the construction of dry-stone walls and roads by themselves".

ShT = James Dow : The Shamanís Touch : Otomi` Indian Symbolic Healing. U of UT Pr, Salt Lake City, 1986.

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